Vintage Skin Care- Noxzema

I wasn’t always a Noxema girl, but as a pre-teen, I really wanted to be.  I did not grow up in a household that purchased specialized products, so to actually be a Noxema girl was  an unachievable dream for me.

Fast forward to a few years later and it is my must have for treating sunburn, razorburn, and super important following a cold which always leaves me with a raw nose.  I slather it everywhere and experience relief within 24 hours.

Noxema was created in 1914 by Dr. J. Frances Townsend.  It was originally called Townsend R22 and was created to treat sunburn.  Go figure.  I thought I had figured that one out before anyone.  When the invention was passed on to Dr. George Bunting, he had bigger ideas and sold it for a wider commercial target.

Farrah Fawcett was a Noxema girl in the 70s, which is probably what made me want to be a Noxema girl, as even my skateboarding was modeled after her portrayal of the same.

I still use Noxema for sunburn, but I find that most often I use it as thick slather here and there for many different reasons.

A few years ago, I recommended Noxema to a friend who complained of dry, tight skin on her face.  In her accolades of triumph, she told me the tales of her experience.  As with everything she did, her husband tried it too.  I laughed at the picture conjured up when she told me of the two of them, walking their dog through the community, their faces fully covered in thick layers of Noxema.

I went off my own homemade skin care for a while and tried a high end product, even became a sales partner in that group.  What I found after 90 days was that my skin was at first glance no better or no worse for the large expense of those products.  There was an immediate effect (dropping off of a milia), but after the 90 days, I was happy to go back to making my own.  One thing I did notice without my daily glycolic ritual; EEK – lines were forming around my lips.  So I did what any logical person would do and what you will be tempted to do too, I OD’d on glycolic acid.  I didn’t ease back in but went full throttle, wanting immediate results.  I overdried my skin.  My lips looked worse, as I took them to pre-peeling stage and I mildly burned some areas of my face, where I targeted some brown spots that seemed to be arising.  Ta, da da!  Noxema to the rescue! I slathered it on, and when that soaked in, I slathered it again;  and even a third time.  I slept in that and followed today with only hyaluronic acid, pampering my skin for a day.  I’ll re-start my regimen tomorrow with 5% glycolic.  And patience.

When your skin feels over-dry, or when you; like me, are impatient with your acids, slather this vintage  formula on.

Contents: camphor, menthol and eucalyptus.

Note:  Noxema contains camphor, and must never be applied to open wounds.

The above link for products is an Affiliate Link.  When you order products through the links on my site, I receive compensation.

I wasn’t always a Noxzema girl, but as a pre-teen, I really wanted to be.  I did not grow up in a household that purchased specialized products, so to actually be a Noxzema girl was  an    unachievable dream for me.

Fast forward to a few years later and it is my must have for treating sunburn, razorburn, and super important following a cold which always leaves me with a raw nose.  I slather it everywhere and experience relief within 24 hours.

Noxzema was created in 1914 by Dr. J. Frances Townsend.  It was originally called Townsend R22 and was created to treat sunburn.  Go figure.  I thought I had figured that one out before anyone.  When the invention was passed on to Dr. George Bunting, he had bigger ideas and sold it for a wider commercial target.  

Farrah Fawcett was a Noxzema girl in the 70s, which is probably what made me want to be a Noxzema girl, as even my skateboarding was modeled after her portrayal of the same.

I still use Noxzema for sunburn, but I find that most often I use it as thick slather here and there for many different reasons.  

A few years ago, I recommended Noxzema to a friend who complained of dry, tight skin on her face.  In her accolades of triumph, she told me the tales of her experience.  As with everything she did, her husband tried it too.  I laughed at the picture conjured up when she told me of the two of them, walking their dog through the community, their faces fully covered in thick layers of Noxzema.  

I went off my own homemade skin care for a while and tried a high end product, even became a sales partner in that group.  What I found after 90 days was that my skin was at first glance no better or no worse for the large expense of those products.  There was an immediate effect (dropping off of a milia), but after the 90 days, I was happy to go back to making my own.  One thing I did notice without my daily glycolic ritual; EEK – lines were forming around my lips.  So I did what any logical person would do and what you will be tempted to do too, I OD’d on glycolic acid.  I didn’t ease back in but went full throttle, wanting immediate results.  I over-dried my skin.  My lips looked worse, as I took them to pre-peeling stage and I mildly burned some areas of my face, where I targeted some brown spots that seemed to be arising.  Ta, da da!  Noxzema to the rescue! I slathered it on, and when that soaked in, I slathered it again;  and even a third time.  I slept in that and followed today with only hyaluronic acid, pampering my skin for a day.  I’ll re-start my regimen tomorrow with 5% glycolic acid.  And patience.  

When your skin feels over-dry, or when you; like me, are impatient with your acids, slather this vintage  formula on.  

Contents: camphor, menthol and eucalyptus.

Note:  Noxzema contains camphor, and must never be applied to open wounds.